TIPS FROM THE BONNAROO DEPT. OF HEALTH

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​The Bonnaroo vibe is a beautiful thing,
but remember that you are in the middle of a city of 80,000 people, so—
• Lock your valuables in your car or in a Bonnaroo Storage Locker. A tent fly isn’t exactly a locked door.
• Be aware of your surroundings. Know where you’re going and who’s around you.
• Practice a “neighborhood watch.” If you see something, say something. (Where have we heard that before?) Look for a member of Bonnaroo’s safety team and clue them in.



​How do we get by? With a little help from our friends, of course!
If one of your crew is out of it, is heading for trouble or is vulnerable for any other reason, you have friendship duties to fulfill. Stay close and see them through it. Or if needed, get help (remember, our policy is “no questions asked”—anything you tell our medical or safety team is confidential). Be there for them like you’d want them to be there for you.



​You’ve heard this before, and you’re gonna hear it again right now: drink water (and other nonalcoholic beverages). When should you drink them? Drink before you’re thirsty. Dehydration is the number-one cause of unhappiness at Bonnaroo. Water makes your brain and body work, and you need them both to enjoy Bonnaroo. (Not a water drinker? Then tank up with sports drinks, iced tea or anything else without alcohol. Also, foods like apples, watermelon, pineapple and cucumber are like tasty mini water-bottles.) Let us pee completely clear about this . . . Easy way to tell if you’re properly hydrated: Your pee should be clear and odorless. If it’s stinky and yellow, then “urine trouble.”



Medical and safety locations at Bonnaroo are safe havens—meaning, you can’t get in trouble for anything you say to medical or safety staff at Bonnaroo. That’s the deal. So if a friend needs help, please stick around and help fill in the blanks. No one will hassle you. And if you think you might need assistance, don’t worry, speak up. Whatever you tell us is confidential—Bonnaroo staff are here for you and no one else.



Tennessee swelters in the summertime. Even when the sun hides, there’s a good chance you’ll feel like a Moon Pie dipped in hot chocolate sauce. Protect yourself. Pack a hat, breathable clothing and plenty of water. And don’t forget to apply sunscreen early (before you roll out of your tent) and often. Otherwise risk surrendering your Day 4 to the dogs.



There’s one easy way to wreck your weekend (and your friends’): Drugs and alcohol. Drugs raise your body temperature (sometimes fatally) and drain H2O from your cells, while alcohol dehydrates you. Under the brutal June sun, your body and mind can fry way too easily. And the dangers of combining substances are only multiplied in this environment.

 

WARNING SIGNS OF DRUG OR ALCOHOL OVERDOSE

  • Pale skin/ skin discoloration
  • Inability to talk
  • Blurred vision
  • Inability to stay awake
  • Irregular breathing
  • Skin that is cool and sweaty or hot and dry (instead of hot and sweaty)
  • Sleepiness, confusion and disorientation
  • Difficulty standing or walking
  • Unconsciousness
  • Seizures
 

If you or a friend are in trouble, please seek out medical help IMMEDIATELY. Medical and security are safe havens at Bonnaroo, and you will not get in trouble for anything you do or say. Their only concern is your well-being.


​A FRIENDLY REMINDER
(from a Guy Named Toby):

We asked a friend who’s been to every single Bonnaroo what the secret of having a good time is.
He had a great answer:

“Pace yourself. Take the time to eat and sleep. Sometimes I even take a nap during the day. I also drink a lot of ‘in-between’ drinks, like Gatorade and water. Bonnaroo is no fun if you’re all burned out by day 2. Been there.”

 

MEDICAL
EMERGENCY
SERVICES

 

WHERE: In the Main Venue the tent is located near the bleachers. There are two Medical tents located in Centeroo: one located to the left of the Ferris Wheel and one located between the Cinema Tent and This Tent. Also, Each campground POD has medical staff on duty 24 hours a day, look for the balloon.

Things happen: bee stings, arm-wrestling injuries, face rocked off. That’s why the Main Venue, Centeroo and every POD is home to a Bonnaroo medical tent, staffed around the clock with Bonnaroo medical staff. For your safety, the medical tents area all staffed with licensed professionals. The Centeroo medical tent is staffed with nurses and physicians along with roaming medical staff in the concert venue.

In an emergency, if you’re not near a medical tent, find a staff person with a radio, or notify the nearest security personnel.

HEALTH TIP: If you’re not sure whether it’s an emergency, assume it is and get help right away.

EMERGENCY VEHICLE ACCESS

Our roads might not look like city streets. But for emergency and maintenance vehicles, they do the job as long as you keep them open. Which is what we ask you to do. Please park in designated areas and don’t drive around the site. Walk on the sides of the roads, and please let all official vehicles through.

SAFETY STAFF

WHERE: You can find our safety staff roaming through every campground, at every POD, at the entrance to Centeroo and the Main Venue and at all the stages, as well as throughout all of Centeroo and the Main Venue.

Our safety (aka, security) staff is trained to help make sure everyone has a good time and stays safe. If you have a security issue in the campgrounds, each POD has a security station open 24 hours. Mounted security patrols (yes, on horseback!) roam the campground areas at all times and can assist as well. Lasso one if you need help.

All vehicles will be searched on entry to the festival at the Toolbooths (which you should definitely keep in mind when deciding what to bring). And prepare to be (politely) searched each time you enter Centeroo or the Main Venue.  Find out what you can and can’t bring in here.

FOOD SAFETY

Please don’t buy from unlicensed vendors. We work hard to ensure all official food and drink is good and safe. And really, if you buy something from an unlicensed vendor, you have no idea what you’re getting. There are lots of great stuff to buy from official Bonnaroo vendors, who deserve your business, not least because they have made a real commitment to support Bonnaroo.

ABOUT ALCOHOL

The sale of alcohol is strictly prohibited. If you’re legal, you can bring it for your own enjoyment only. But, there is a limit to what you may bring.

You may bring: 2 cases of beer per person per car, and one (1) 1.75 liter of hard liquor per person per car, and 2 boxes of wine per person per car. (Really, that’s plenty for a weekend, don’t you think?) Anything more than that will be confiscated when we inspect your vehicle on arrival.

No glass containers of any kind are allowed into the campgrounds or concert areas.
No kegs are allowed into the festival.
No outside alcohol is allowed into Centeroo and the What Stage Venue.

ABOUT DRUGS

The Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival stands squarely against drug use. First, It’s dangerous to your health, especially in the June heat. Second, it can ruin the weekend for you and those around you. And last but not least it’s against the law: If it’s illegal outside the festival, it’s illegal inside, too.

If you see someone who is sick, upset, scared or clearly having a bad experience, get help. Find a medical tent or festival staff member. Provide all the information you can to safety or medical staff our “no questions asked” policy means neither you nor the sick person can get in trouble when you seek help.

Our number-one concern is the well-being of all Bonnaroovians. By steering clear of substances and getting help for those who need it, you are contributing positively to the Bonnaroo vibe, and the entire community thanks you for that.

CAN WE TALK ABOUT SEX FOR A MINUTE?

We love a good roll in the hay (or sleeping bag) as much as the next person. Just be sure your hay-mate is as excited about it as you are.
What seems like harmless fun to one person can do lasting damage to another. Here’s how to—
 

AVOID
SEXUAL ASSAULT

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Be aware of your surroundings. Trust your instincts. If you’re uncomfortable, move on.
Don’t go it alone. Travel in pairs and stay in well-lit areas.
Date rape drugs are real. Don’t take drinks from strangers. Also, don’t set your drink down and pick it up later.

HELP SOMEONE WHO'S BEEN
SEXUALLY ASSAULTED

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Help them seek immediate medical attention and notify safety personnel. It should never be brushed off or taken lightly.
If the assaulter is still nearby, stay with the victim.
Be supportive and a good listener—reassure them they are not to blame.

AVOID BEING A SEXUAL
ASSAULTER YOURSELF

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Remember that “no” means “NO,” even if it’s said politely.
Keep in mind that someone who is wasted is not capable of making responsible decisions. (That goes for both of you.)
Monitor yourself. Some people cross the line without realizing it.